Can you please reply as soon as possible?

Can you please reply as soon as possible?

Because this is an important problem, I would appreciate a response as soon as possible. "I would appreciate your speedy response." "I want to hear from you as soon as possible." "I look forward to hearing from you as soon as possible." (It's a little archaic.)

Also, using the word "please" is acceptable in email. It shows that you are a polite person and that you are not angry with me.

Finally, if you need more time, it's okay to ask for it. Say something like, "I might need a bit more time to respond since I'm still trying to figure out what to say." Or you can simply add a short note explaining why you need more time. For example: "I'll get back to you as soon as I can."

That being said, don't expect a quick response if you send off an email at midnight on a Saturday.

How do you say, "I am still waiting for your formal response."?

How Do You Say "I'm Waiting For Your Reply" Politely?

  1. Using “Look forward”
  2. 2. “ I appreciate any information you may have”
  3. 3. “ I appreciate your quick response”
  4. Use a call-to-action.
  5. “Always happy to hear from you / Always happy to see your reply soon.”
  6. Using the phrase “I expect to hear from you soon.”
  7. Use the phrase” Please respond at your earliest convenience.”

How do you ask for a speedy reply?

  1. An early reply would be appreciated.
  2. I look forward to your reply.
  3. I look forward to hearing from you.
  4. I would appreciate a reply at your earliest convenience.
  5. Your earliest attention would be appreciated.

How do you write? I am waiting for your reply.?

7 Responses to "I Look Forward to Hearing From You"

  1. Use a call-to-action.
  2. I’m eager to receive your feedback.
  3. I appreciate your quick response.
  4. Always happy to hear from you.
  5. Keep me informed . . .
  6. I await your immediate response.
  7. Write soon!

How do you say I will wait for your reply in an email?

How Do You Say "I'm Waiting For Your Reply" Politely?

  1. Using “Look forward”
  2. 2. “
  3. 3. “
  4. Use a call-to-action.
  5. “Always happy to hear from you / Always happy to see your reply soon.”
  6. Using the phrase “I expect to hear from you soon.”
  7. Use the phrase” Please respond at your earliest convenience.”

If you're in line and a customer service representative says, "Thank you for waiting," and you haven't been there long and/or it's obvious that the person worked as quickly and efficiently as possible, you could respond, "thank you for getting to me quickly" or "thank you for making the wait a short one."

I will hear from you soon.?

We also use the word "looking forward to" at the conclusion of official letters and emails to express our desire to hear from someone or our expectation that something will occur. We utilize the existing simple form: I eagerly await your response. I'm hoping to hear from you shortly.

The phrase is used in a similar manner to other expressions such as "keep up with developments", "watch out for changes", "be on the lookout for". It can also be used to indicate that someone has done something to deserve attention or reward. For example, his action was looking forward to hearing from you soon.

Looking forward to means that one is excited about something - especially if it hasn't happened yet! If you want to sound more professional, try saying that you look forward to receiving / responding to his email.

Is it OK to say I hope to hear from you soon?

We also use the word "looking forward to" at the conclusion of official letters and emails to express our desire to hear from someone or our expectation that something will occur. We utilize the existing simple form: I eagerly await your response. I'm hoping to hear from you shortly.

"I Hope This Email Finds You Well" Replaced by 5 Better Alternatives

  1. Nothing at all.
  2. Something personal.
  3. “I know you’re swamped, so I’ll be brief.”
  4. “We met at ______.”
  5. A bit of small talk.

How do you reply to "I’ll be waiting."?

"I anticipate your response," I'd say (very formal). Alternatively, 'I eagerly await your response' (appropriate in formal settings, more casual).

About Article Author

Bradley Smith

Bradley Smith has been writing and publishing for over 15 years. He is an expert on all things writing-related, from grammar and style guide development to the publishing industry. He loves teaching people how to write, and he especially enjoys helping others improve their prose when they don't feel like they're skilled enough to do it themselves.

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