How do you end a sonnet?

How do you end a sonnet?

The poetry in a Shakespearean sonnet concludes with a couplet, which is two lines that rhyme with each other but not necessarily with the preceding lines. The last six lines of a Petrarchan sonnet serve as the poem's finish, or as some could call it, the "answer."

In order to conclude a sonnet, a poet must first establish its structure. A sonnet has an opening line (or octave) and a closing line (or sestet). Between these two lines there are usually fourteen syllables. However, this isn't a rigid rule and many sonnets have fifteen or three words instead.

A sonnet opens with an octave that measures eight lines equal in length. This is followed by a sestet of six lines also measuring eight syllables each. Together, the octave and sestet make up the whole of the sonnet. Now that we know how many lines are in a sonnet, any word or phrase used to measure those lines becomes important. Common units include quatrains (four-line stanzas) and tercets (three-line stanzas).

Sonnets were originally written for the entertainment of another person, usually a lady like Queen Elizabeth I, but they can also be written for someone who will understand them without explanation - such as a lover. Today, sonnets continue to be written by poets for others to read and enjoy.

Do all sonnets conclude with a couplet?

There are two types of sonnets: Shakespearean and Petrarchan. Both contain 14 lines, but the ends are very different. Remember that the last lines of a sonnet nearly always rhyme.

Petrarchan sonnets have a unique end structure that includes one tercet (three-line section) and three quatrains (four-line sections). Unlike sonnets from Shakespeare or other English poets, petrarcan sonnets do not include a final couplet.

This poem is an example of a Shakespearean sonnet:

Sonnet 116 by William Shakespeare

A Shakespearean sonnet contains two stanzas of equal length, separated by a line containing the closing rhyme scheme -ay/ae/y-. The first line of the sonnet starts with a capital letter to indicate it is the title of the poem, while the second line begins with a lowercase letter.

Shakespeare used various forms of poetry before he wrote sonnets. He also used blank verse, which is unrhymed iambic pentameter. This form of poetry was popular at the time because it could be read at a rapid rate without reading too slowly. Sonnets were originally written for the entertainment of others, so they tend to be short poems.

How do you end a sonnet poem?

The poetry in a Shakespearean sonnet concludes with a couplet, which is two lines that rhyme with each other but not necessarily with the preceding lines. The last six lines of a Petrarchan sonnet serve as the poem's finish, or as some could call it, the "answer." "End on a high note!"

Without further ado, here are the eight steps to writing a poem.

  1. Brainstorm your starting point.
  2. Free-write in prose.
  3. Choose your poem’s form and style.
  4. Read for inspiration.
  5. Start writing for an audience of one — you.
  6. Read your poem out loud.
  7. Take a break to refresh your mind.
  8. Revise your poem.

What are the two lines at the end of a sonnet known as?

In a Shakespearean sonnet, the last two lines are referred to as a couplet. It is a poem consisting of two lines of poetry, often but not always rhyming together.

These two lines are called the closing couplet and they usually but not always close the poem. They can be in any order except that they must contain the word "love" or some derivation thereof.

So for example, here are three different ways of closing a Shakespearean sonnet:

The first one uses the word "love": Love's rose smells sweet, though thorns bruise its stem. (Sonnet 18)

The second one repeats the last line of the poem: O! love's triumph then, – let it grow / By comparing joy with joy! (Sonnet 35)

And the third one describes a feeling rather than naming an object: But now methinks I see the why/ Why those who call themselves poets live in pain: It is because they feel but cannot feel their way.

About Article Author

Bernice Mcduffie

Bernice Mcduffie is a writer and editor. She has a degree from one of the top journalism schools in the country. Bernice loves writing about all sorts of topics, from fashion to feminism.

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