How do you identify a topic sentence and a controlling idea?

How do you identify a topic sentence and a controlling idea?

Components of a subject phrase A subject sentence consists of only two parts: the topic and the governing concept. The paragraph's topic is what it's about, and the controlling concept is why you're writing it. The topic is highlighted in orange in the samples below, while the governing notion is highlighted in green. Note that not all sentences contain both a topic and a controlling idea. For example, this sentence has only a topic but no controlling idea: His ideas were on target but his execution was poor. On the other hand, this sentence has both a topic and a controlling idea: Her book describes how to save money by finding cheaper alternatives to standard procedures.

In addition to these two elements, a good subject sentence should be clear and concise, without unnecessary words or phrases. It should also be grammatically correct.

Here are some examples of good subject sentences:

The movie was about a young man who moves to New York City to seek fame and fortune as a musician. Although it was not a documentary, it did show him performing songs from various periods in his life. He seemed like a talented guy who had great ideas but could not execute them well.

His ideas were on target but his execution was poor. She saved a lot of money by switching to an alternative procedure. Alternative procedures are slower but they cost less than standard ones. She managed to find several ways to reduce her costs without sacrificing quality.

What is the controlling idea in a topic sentence?

The subject phrase is composed of two components: the topic and a governing notion. The topic is what the paragraph will be about, and the controlling concept is why it is being written. The topic sentence informs the reader about the aim of your paragraph. It can also suggest how to think about the topic.

In its simplest form, the controlling idea is just a statement that sums up the paragraph. But it can also be a question that leads into a discussion, or an opinion that forms the basis for a persuasive essay. The key is that there should be one main idea that guides everything else in the paragraph.

For example, let's say I want to write about my favorite band, Radiohead. My first step would be to decide on a topic sentence that tells readers exactly what the paragraph is going to be about. In this case, it could be "Radiohead is a British rock band with alternative music as its core sound." Now that I have my topic sentence, I can start writing about different aspects of their music to show how diverse and unique they are.

As another example, let's say I want to write about my summer vacation.

What is the sentence that reveals the main idea of the paragraph?

The sentence in which the main concept of the paragraph is expressed is known as the topic sentence. It is without a doubt the most essential statement in the paragraph. The subject sentence is usually divided into two parts: (a) the topic and (b) the governing notion. The topic sentence states the main idea of the paragraph while the governing notion provides further clarification or explanation.

In this paragraph, the main idea is expressed in the topic sentence "Language is a tool used by humans to communicate." While this sentence explains why language is important, it can be expanded upon by saying that language is useful because it allows us to communicate with one another. Language is a means of communication because it allows people to express themselves to one another. This expands on the topic sentence by providing more detail about how language works.

Language is a tool used by humans to communicate. Language is useful because it allows us to interact with one another. Language is a means of communication because it expresses thoughts and ideas. This expands on the topic sentence by explaining what language is not.

Language is not music! Music is an art form that has many different types of expressions/styles. Language only has one way of expressing yourself - through words. Music can be expressed in many ways - through instruments, voices, etc..

In conclusion, the topic sentence tells us what language is while the governing notion explains what else it isn't.

What is an example of a controlling idea?

There shall be a topic and a governing concept in each topic phrase. The controlling notion indicates the overall direction of the paragraph. Here are a couple such examples: The theme is "ABC Town has the worst pollution in the world," and the controlling idea is "many causes." This tells us that despite all the pollution in ABC Town, it is not just the coal mine or the power plant that is to blame but also many other factors.

The topic is "My friend's birthday is on Tuesday" and the controlling idea is "birthdays are fun." This tells us that even though we want it to be a surprise party, it is better if we tell everyone about the party early so they can start planning what they're going to wear.

What is a clear topic sentence?

A subject sentence is the opening sentence of a paragraph that outlines the topic and the paragraph's governing notion. A subject sentence should contain a topic, a governing concept, and the author's point of view. It can be as simple as "Photography is an art" or "Asking questions is important in interviewing," but it must include these three elements.

Every essay should have a clear main idea or topic expressed in a single sentence. This sentence should be stated in such a way that readers can tell whether or not they agree with it. If they do not agree then they should be able to explain why not. They may disagree for many different reasons such as bias, prejudice, or personal opinion. However, if they do agree then they should be able to explain how or why this idea/topic deserves more attention. A clear topic allows readers to think about the essay in their own words and come up with their own ideas about it.

In addition to having a clear main idea, every essay should have a subject sentence that states this idea/topic in a specific context.

About Article Author

Jennifer Green

Jennifer Green is a professional writer and editor. She has been published in the The New York Times, The Huffington Post and many other top publications. She has won awards for her editorials from the Association of Women Editors and the Society of Professional Journalists.

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