How do you quote within a quote within a quote?

How do you quote within a quote within a quote?

Quotes inside a Quotation To include quotations within another quotation, use single quotation marks. "When I interviewed the quarterback, he simply claimed they "played a better game," the reporter added. The coach replied by saying that it was because they were from Massachusetts and believed in working hard." - John Feinstein, author and journalist

Quotes inside a second quotation Do not use single quotation marks when quoting within a quotation. "The reporter asked him why his team played a better game after he said something positive about them. He answered by saying that they came from Massachusetts and believed in working hard." - John Feinstein, author and journalist

Third-party quotes Only use single quotation marks when referring to a third party. "In an interview with ESPN, Saban said, 'I think if you look at our record, we've had a lot of players who have gone on to have successful careers after leaving Alabama.' " - An article by Joe Schad, published in The Birmingham News, regarding Nick Saban's retirement

Second-and-third-party quotes Use double quotation marks when referring to a second or third party. "In an interview with ESPN, Saban said, "I think if you look at our record, we've had a lot of players who have gone on to have successful careers after leaving Alabama.

How do you put a quote within a quote at the end of a sentence?

When you have a quotation within a quotation, use single quotation marks inside double quotation marks.

What are single quotes used for?

Single quotation marks are used to indicate a quote within a quote or a straight quote in the headline of a news piece. Periods are usually used within quote marks. If the quote within a quote is a question, a question mark is put inside single quotation marks.

Using single quotations marks is an easy way to make your writing more accurate and clear because you are telling the reader exactly what part of speech each word is. You can also use them when writing headlines or summaries. They make your writing stand out from the rest because they are such a unique style.

As well as being used in headlines, single quotations marks are also used in written language throughout other parts of articles and essays. For example, you might want to include a quote within a sentence to add emphasis or interest to that sentence. In this case, you would need to use single quotations marks because periods are not allowed within sentences.

Finally, single quotations marks are used when referring to something quoted in another document or article. For example, if I was writing an essay about how funny cats are, I would probably include some quotes from people who think cats are fun. These quotes would be followed by references using double quotations marks because these refer to whole sentences instead of words.

In conclusion, single quotations marks are used to indicate a quote within a quote or a straight quote.

Do quotes need quotations?

Quotation marks are only used for direct quotes. If you're quoting from a textual source, put the quote within quotation marks unless you intend to paraphrase it.

As for visual sources, like photographs and posters, they don't require quotation marks because there's no risk of confusing them with their original text.

Also, a quote within a quote is called a "within-quotes phrase" or "citation".

Finally, a quote within a quote within a quote is called an "inner-quoted phrase". Or simply a "three-quote phrase".

Quotes within quotes within quotes...? You get the idea by now!

How to quote what someone has written?

When citing someone's precise words, whether spoken or written, use quote marks exclusively. This is known as a direct quotation. "I love my cherries chocolate-covered," Alyssa joked. "Good dog, good dog!" Jackie kept saying. Direct quotations are marked with exactly which words come from whom. In this case, the phrase "my cherries chocolate-covered" was said by Alyssa and "good dog, good dog!" was said by Jackie.

If you are including a fragment of text in your own work, in order for it to be considered a direct quotation you will need to include all the surrounding context too. In other words, the whole thing together must make sense as a complete sentence or paragraph. "Jackie liked her dogs so much because they were both good workers." In this case, the part that makes up the fragment is "good workers", which can be its own sentence.

Now let's say that you want to mention some aspect of Alyssa's personality in addition to her love of chocolate-covered cherries. You could do this by including both sentences in one quotation. As you can see, a direct quotation is an exact copy of the original statement or phrase.

About Article Author

Jennifer Campanile

Jennifer Campanile is a freelance writer, editor, and teacher. She has been published in The New York Times, The Nation, and on NPR among other places. She teaches writing at the collegiate level and has been known to spend days in libraries searching for the perfect word.

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