What did Henry David Thoreau fight for?

What did Henry David Thoreau fight for?

Henry David Thoreau is well-known for having embodied the transcendental ideas enshrined in his opus, Walden (1854). As indicated by his article "Civil Disobedience," he was also a supporter of civil liberty (1849). In addition to writing two seminal essays on transcendentalism, "Walking" and "Resistance to Civil Government," Thoreau played an important role in the development of American environmentalism. He pioneered self-sufficient living techniques that are still used today by nature lovers around the world.

Thoreau spent three months in prison for refusing to pay federal income tax (1857). Upon release, he moved to Concord, Massachusetts, where he lived for six years. During this time, he wrote Walden, which was published posthumously in 1854.

Concord became a meeting place for like-minded people who were interested in various forms of resistance against authority. Among others, Thoreau joined a group called the Transcendental Club, which was founded by William Ellery Channing with the aim of promoting religious freedom. The club met weekly to discuss topics such as religion and science.

In 1858, Thoreau married Cynthia Dunbar. The couple had one son together but was divorced four years later. In 1862, he married Elizabeth Palmer Peabody, a fellow writer.

When was Henry David Thoreau considered a success?

Henry David Thoreau (born J. in Concord, Massachusetts, U.S.—died in Concord), American writer, poet, and practical philosopher, best known for living the Transcendentalist principles enshrined in his opus, Walden (1854), and for being a zealous supporter of civil freedoms, as...

Thoreau's father was an attorney who became wealthy practicing law. When Henry was young, the family moved to a larger house with more room for Henry to grow up in. He spent his time reading books from the local library instead of playing with his friends. At age 20, he left home to live alone in a small cabin on top of a hill near town. Here he could focus on writing.

He published two books during his lifetime: A Week on the Concord & Merrimack Rivers (1849) and Cape Cod (1866). Both were very successful. In addition, many of his essays, poems, and reviews were published in magazines at the time.

Thoreau is regarded as one of the founders of environmentalism because of his efforts to protect nature against deforestation and other forms of destruction. His book, Walking (1863), inspired people all over the world to take walks in the countryside and thus promote wildlife conservation.

Furthermore, he is also credited with first proposing a national park system as we know it today.

What was Henry David Thoreau's philosophy?

Henry David Thoreau (born July 12, 1817 in Concord, Massachusetts, U.S.—died May 6, 1862 in Concord), American essayist, poet, and practical philosopher, renowned for having lived the Transcendentalist doctrines as recorded in his masterwork, Walden (1854), and for being a zealous advocate of civil liberties, as reflected in...

Why is Henry David Thoreau an important figure in the transcendental movement?Henry David Thoreau (born J. in Concord, Massachusetts, U.S.--died in Concord), American essayist, poet, and practical philosopher, renowned for having lived the doctrines of Transcendentalism as recorded in his masterwork, Walden (1854), and for having been a vigorous advocate of civil liberties, as reflected...?

Henry David Thoreau (1817-1862) was a New England-born essayist, poet, and natural philosopher. Thoreau was a significant person in the Transcendentalist movement, which thought that a human connection with nature is necessary for intellectual and moral stability, among other things. He coined the term "wilderness survival" when he described living in a tent in order to better appreciate nature. After graduating from Harvard University, Thoreau spent two years working as a tax collector for the government in Massachusetts. In 1846, he moved to Plymouth, where he lived for six months in a cabin on land that is now part of a state park. The experience helped inspire him to write Walden, which was published posthumously in 1854.

Thoreau's main ideas included self-reliance, simplicity, nature study, resistance to authority, and freedom within society's constraints. His work influenced such people as John Muir, Eleanor Roosevelt, Robert Frost, and Allen Ginsberg.

Thoreau is also known for his efforts toward civil liberties. In particular, he fought against the invasion of privacy caused by governmental surveillance programs, such as those conducted by the U.S. Customs Service and the U.S. Postal Service. These programs were common at the time they were developed, but they are still used today by various agencies.

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