What do lines 17 and 18 most reveal about the speaker in the poem?

What do lines 17 and 18 most reveal about the speaker in the poem?

Lines 17-18 Apparently, the speaker did not believe he completely comprehended the vision at the time. This is strange because he seemed to be loving those flowers. The term "wealth" refers to a more lasting form of satisfaction. Perhaps this was why the poet didn't want to leave his friend's garden or town immediately after the vision.

These two lines can also indicate that the speaker was not very mature or understanding at the time he experienced the vision. It could even mean that he was not fully grown up yet.

In addition, these two lines can also show that the speaker was a man who wanted to understand the deeper meaning of life. He wanted to know what wealth was so that he could appreciate his friend's gift properly.

Finally, lines 17-18 can also indicate that the speaker was a man who believed that love was all you needed in life. Even though his friend had given him something priceless, he still felt that he could part with it because there was another gift that could replace it.

Overall, I would say that these two lines reveal that the speaker was a man who wanted to understand the deeper meaning of life. In addition, he was a man who believed that love was all you needed in life.

What is the theme of the poem, friend?

The idea of this poem is that the rewards of being a friend much surpass the benefits of wealth. The poet says in the opening verse that you don't need money to be a friend. Only people look for money when they want to show their friendship.

Throughout the poem, the author uses comparisons to explain that money can't buy love. For example, he says "Love isn't just a feeling; it's an action" and "Money can't buy love, but it can get you a good deal on a wedding ring." He also mentions that money can't cause pain, but it can pay doctors bills when your loved one dies.

At the end of the poem, the author explains that although money cannot buy love, it can still give his friend another chance at happiness.

Thus, the theme of the poem is friendship. Money can't buy love, but it can help our friends find happiness.

Who is the speaker in the poem, Last Bargain?

In the poem, the speaker is a guy seeking for job. 3. Highlight the relevant item in the context of stanza 1. The old guy made a generous offer to the speaker. 19. What does this indicate about the kind of person that old guy is? 20. What does this indicate about the kind of person that the speaker is?

In conclusion, the speaker is a guy who is looking for job. He is not a rich man but he can afford to pay some money for a job. Also, he is not a young guy but instead, he is an old guy like the old guy in the poem. Finally, the speaker is honest because he wants to find a job even though it's not his first choice.

What is the emotional state of the speaker in the first two lines of the poem?

D. In the first two lines of this poem, the speaker describes his "lonely" situation before discovering the "crowd" of daffodils while out strolling. Thus, the speaker discovers how he has been feeling when he says, "The truth is I'm not alone."

This means that the speaker is lonely but then finds comfort in the presence of others. Many people can relate to this because we sometimes feel alone even though there are many people around us. The speaker also realizes that even though he is alone, it does not mean that he is without friends or family. He just needs to open himself up to find happiness.

In conclusion, the speaker is lonely but then finds comfort in the presence of others. This shows that even though we may be alone at times, we should not feel alone because we are not alone in this world. There are many people who care about us and want us to be happy.

What does the first line of the poem Daffodils say about the mood of the poet?

The speaker is "lonely as a cloud" in the opening two lines of the poetry "I Wandered Lonely as a Cloud." When he sees the daffodils, however, he no longer feels lonely since they look as a "crowd," dispelling his loneliness and making him feel "gay" again due to their "glee."

This shows that happiness can make you feel less lonely even if you are by yourself. Even though the speaker is alone, seeing the daffodils makes him feel less lonely because they remind him of people who love him even if he is far away from them. This also implies that loneliness is able to be cured by simply being happy since the daffodils make the speaker feel better even if he is by himself.

Daffodils are known for being cheerful flowers that bring good luck. This poem uses the daffodil as a metaphor for happiness which explains why it brings about a feeling of relief when reading it. The lonely speaker is relieved when he sees the daffodils because they make him feel happier even if he is by himself.

What does the speaker vow in lines 11 and 12?

Lines 11-12 The speaker ends the poem by promising his kid that he will make a commitment. The speaker vows never to "like too much" what he enjoys. In other words, even if he likes something, he won't grow too attached to it because you never know when it will be taken away. Sad.

Vowels are sounds made with the voice or the lungs that indicate a promise or agreement. A vowel sound can be short or long. When you say the word "vowel," think of either an "a" or an "o." Vowels play an important role in language acquisition because they help children distinguish words that are used together often such as dog and cat vs. duck and goat. Also, vowels are responsible for differentiating sounds that would otherwise be hard to differentiate such as the English /ə/ (short vowel) and /ɔ/ (long vowel).

In this case, the speaker has promised not to grow too attached to his love interest because she could stop calling or texting him at any time. This idea is expressed through the use of the present continuous verb form. Present continuous verbs are those that are used to describe actions being done now. They are formed by adding the present simple form of the verb "to be" followed by the present tense of the main verb: "I am eating." "You are singing beautifully."

About Article Author

Bradley Smith

Bradley Smith has been writing and publishing for over 15 years. He is an expert on all things writing-related, from grammar and style guide development to the publishing industry. He loves teaching people how to write, and he especially enjoys helping others improve their prose when they don't feel like they're skilled enough to do it themselves.

Related posts