What is the difference between margin and indent in MS Word?

What is the difference between margin and indent in MS Word?

In Word, a margin is the space around the perimeter of a document. Indents are used to separate paragraphs and are used with margins. If you have a half-inch margin and indent a paragraph by half an inch, there will be a full inch of whitespace to the left of the paragraph.

What is the document margin?

A margin is the space between the text and the document's edge. The margins of a new document are set to "Normal" by default, which means there is a one-inch space between the text and each edge. Word allows you to modify the margin size of your document based on your requirements. For example, if you want to center a picture in a word processing document, you would put it at the top of the page with this option: Left = "-" - Right = "-" - Top = "-" - Bottom = "-".

What do you mean by indentation? How many types of indents are there in MS Word?

In MS Word, there are "four sorts" of indents: The space between the "paragraph" and the "left margin" is shown by a left indent. 3. First line indent: used at the beginning of a paragraph or within a list. All lines but the first one are indented. 4. Last line indent: used at the end of a paragraph or within a list.

What is indentation? What are the different types of indentation available to explain in brief?

Within a document, "indentation" refers to the "space" between the "text" and the "left or right margin." In MS Word, there are "four sorts" of indents: 1. Left indent: shows that there is space between the "paragraph" and the "left margin." Right indent: shows that there is space between the "paragraph" and the "right margin." No indent: same as left indent but within a paragraph instead of between paragraphs. Full indent: shows that there is no space between the "paragraph" and the "margin."

Left and right indentations are useful for creating a "tighter" appearance to a document while no indent allows more "freedom" to the reader/viewer's imagination. Full indent is usually used at the beginning of a chapter or section to indicate that what follows was written by someone other than the person who wrote the previous material.

In general, any word or phrase followed by an em-dash (--) uses full indent. An en-dash (–) uses no indent.

Right now, I'm using left indent to show where one section ends and another begins. I'll see how it looks when I get some real writing done!

What are the types of page margins?

Margin refers to page borders in print, and spacing between items on a webpage on the Web. A Microsoft Word page has four margins: top, bottom, left, and right. Top and bottom margins contain the page header and footer; left and right margins contain the viewable text. The header, footer, and inside margins are fixed; that is, you cannot change their size or position when you publish your document. Only the outside margins can be changed.

The two outside margins are called "gutter" margins. They're necessary because pages are printed on sheets of paper that have no margin around them. So if you don't have any space between the page edge and the writing, something will have to give. Either the page will be too short (and an end-of-page marker should be added) or the writing will spill over onto another page (and the printer won't like this).

In web design, gutter margins are used so that the distance between elements on a page (such as headlines or images) is maintained even when the text at the smallest setting is displayed on a screen. For example, if you create a website with 50% width divs, then the distance between each div will be 10 pixels.

About Article Author

James Johnson

James Johnson is a writer and editor. He loves to read and write about all kinds of topics-from personal experience to the latest trends in life sciences.

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