What is the main message of the set or the last 6 lines?

What is the main message of the set or the last 6 lines?

The essential theme of Sonnet 29 is contained in the poem's last six lines, or sestet. The stillness has given the speaker hope as he passionately lingers on his life's sorrows and gloomy broodings. He recalls the lady in his life, and he realizes he is no longer alone. In fact, she has joined him in mourning their lost love.

The poem begins with a statement of intent: "Here's to my love" (1). But the speaker soon regrets having written such words, since they can lead to no good outcome (3). As the poem progresses, it becomes clear that the lady does not want to marry or even see her lover again (5-8). At this point, the speaker feels desperate enough to send out spies to find out what happened to his love (9-12). Finally, he decides to do something about it by writing a sonnet pleading with the lady to forgive him and to stop this marriage they have been forced into (13-14).

At first glance, this poem might seem like another example of heartache poetry, but there is much more going on here. The poet is not just mourning the loss of his love, but also trying to come to terms with it. He has realized that she does not want to get back together so he is begging her to leave him alone.

Sonnet 29 is one of Shakespeare's more unusual poems.

What is the main message of the first 8 lines of Sonnet 29?

The fundamental theme of the octet, or the first eight lines of George Santayana's sonnet 29, is that the narrator of the poem is wondering why he/she feels the narrator is "poor" and "sad." He doesn't think he's impoverished or miserable, and he's fighting himself against it. The answer comes at the end of the sonnet: "love so amazing". Love is so amazing that it makes the narrator feel poor and sad when it isn't reciprocated.

Sonnet 29 is one of 154 poems in the 15th century collection called "The Forest of Arden" written by Shakespeare. It is a companion piece to Sonnet 28 which asks similar questions but from the point of view of the beloved. In both cases, the author uses rhetorical questions to explore how love can make him feel poor and sad when he has plenty of money and life is looking up otherwise.

Love is powerful because it can make us do irrational things. It can make us act contrary to logic or reason. This is what the poet is exploring in these two sonnets. He wants to know if love is really worth all this pain and suffering.

Another way to look at it is that the poet is asking himself whether love is strong enough to survive death. Since they will never meet again after the funeral, there's no point in mourning for too long since it won't bring back the person who died.

What is the main message of the octet, or first 8 lines?

Expert Approved Answer The fundamental theme of the octet, or the first eight lines of George Santayana's sonnet 29, is that the narrator of the poem is wondering why he/she feels the narrator is "poor" and "sad." The answer to his question is found in the last line of the poem: "I am rich in memories of those who loved me." Memories are the only thing that can make us feel rich, and the narrator knows this full well.

An alternative interpretation could be that the poet is asking him/herself why others see him as poor when he is not. Perhaps because of his appearance? His social status? They don't know him personally so they cannot judge how he truly is. Or maybe they do know him but they view him as poor because he has no money? This would explain why the poet includes memories in his answer: since he knows that others rely on him for support, he wants to make sure that he isn't seen as poor by them.

Either way, the main idea is the same: memories are what makes us feel rich. And since the narrator of the poem says that he is rich in memories, we can assume that he/she feels nostalgic about past events with people who have passed away. These could be family members, friends, or even celebrities.

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Homer Barraza

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