What is the so-what part of a conclusion?

What is the so-what part of a conclusion?

When you write your conclusion using the "so what?" technique, you are thinking what some of the ramifications of your argument could be beyond the arguments previously expressed in your paper. To employ this tactic, consider the following question: "How does my argument alter how I view the text or issue?" You should then answer this question by discussing any possible negative effects of your argument on other people or issues.

The so-what technique is useful for making your essay more relevant to today's society and for making your argument more persuasive. By considering what would happen if your argument failed, you can identify weaknesses in your logic and improve your paper accordingly.

Furthermore, by considering the possible positive implications of your argument, you can highlight advantages that may not have been considered by your opponent. This can make it easier for readers to judge the merit of your argument.

In conclusion, use of the so-what method can help you discuss potential negative effects of your argument on others or issues beyond those already raised, and positive implications of your argument that may not have been considered before. This can make your essay more relevant and persuasive.

How do you summarize a conclusion?

Strategies towards a successful ending

  1. Play the “So What” Game.
  2. Return to the theme or themes in the introduction.
  3. Summarize.
  4. Pull it all together.
  5. Include a provocative insight or quotation from the research or reading you did for the paper.
  6. Propose a course of action, a solution to an issue, or questions for further study.

How can I improve my conclusion?

One or more of the tactics listed below may assist you in writing an excellent conclusion:

  1. Play the “So What” Game.
  2. Return to the theme or themes in the introduction.
  3. Synthesize, don’t summarize.
  4. Include a provocative insight or quotation from the research or reading you did for your paper.

How do you write a professional conclusion?

Techniques for crafting a strong conclusion

  1. Play the “So What” Game.
  2. Return to the theme or themes in the introduction.
  3. Synthesize, don’t summarize.
  4. Include a provocative insight or quotation from the research or reading you did for your paper.

What question does a conclusion address or answer?

When should you use a conclusion? In other terms, it provides a solution to the question "why." A conclusion, on the other hand, resolves the "so what" issue by clarifying the essay's thesis and providing the reader with a solution, query, or insight into the subject matter that reinforces why they should care. Just like the other parts of an essay, your conclusion should have a clear topic sentence that expresses the main idea of your argument.

Some common topics for conclusions include: comparisons, contrasts, cases, examples, causes, effects, applications, implications, suggestions, questions, problems, concerns, objections, opinions, and so on.

A conclusion is not an extension of the body of the essay or a summary of its contents. It is a separate section that often includes a restatement of the essay's central message or idea accompanied by a brief response or reaction to any arguments raised in the paper.

Like the body of the essay, a conclusion should be written in a formal style, using standard grammar and punctuation. However, since this is a brief section of the essay, there is no need for lengthy sentences or complex language. A conclusion is also allowed to use simpler language appropriate for readers who are not as academically inclined.

In addition to the main idea, another important element in a good conclusion is clarity. Since this is a summary section, the writer needs to make sure that everything is clear and understandable to readers.

Why do you always have to draw a conclusion in any written research report?

The purpose of the conclusion of your paper is to reiterate the major point. It reminds the reader of the primary points of your main argument(s) and restates the most essential evidence supporting those points (s). This lessens the weight of the argument(s) you've built in your essay.

Conclusions are also useful for bringing your paper together into a single statement. Many academic papers are divided into several sections, each dealing with one topic or idea. The conclusion section allows you to summarize all these different topics or ideas within your paper into a single sentence or two. This makes your paper more concise and easier to read.

Finally, conclusions are important because they help readers understand the significance of your paper. Whether your conclusion is stated explicitly or not, it should convey the message that what you've argued is important and that your audience should take it seriously.

In short, conclusions are useful tools for tying up loose ends in your paper and for making its main messages clear to the reader.

About Article Author

Peter Perry

Peter Perry is a writer, editor, and teacher. His work includes books, articles, blog posts, and scripts for television, and film. He has a master's degree in Writing from Emerson College.

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