When do you put a comma after the name in an email?

When do you put a comma after the name in an email?

When you start your email greeting with "Hello" or "Hi," insert a comma before the name of the person you're contacting. It is also customary to include a comma following the name of the person you are addressing. (*) Hello, Michael, for example. Thank you for covering the cost of our meal last night. (*)

There are two schools of thought on this matter: one school says no commas after the word hello or hi; the other says yes, commas are always appropriate after a person's name.

The rule against putting commas after the word hello or hi comes from a book written in 1866 by Henry Hart Milman, a British poet and lawyer. His book, The Law of Commas, explains that when writing letters it is incorrect to include commas after the words "hello" or "hi". If you follow this rule, people will think that you are not properly educated or that you are trying to be rude. Commas are used after names to indicate separate people or items on a list. For example, "Michael, my cousin, and Jessica, a friend of mine" or "Barbara, my wife, Amy, my daughter, and I." Without the comma, it would be unclear whether Barbara, my wife, was the only person mentioned by name.

In conclusion, commas are used after names to indicate separate people or items on a list. This is called enumeration.

Do you put a comma after a first name?

When the salutation in your letter or email begins with "Hello" or "Hi," place a comma before the name of the person to whom you're writing. It is also customary to use a comma following the name of the person to whom you are writing. For example, if you were writing to someone named John, you would write, "Hello, John!"

If there is more than one person with the same first name in your audience, separate each name with a comma. For example, if you were writing to several John Smiths, you would write, "Hello, John! My name is Chris and I work for ABC Company." Commas are used when writing to multiple people with different last names, too. For example, if you were writing to several Johnsons, you would write, "Hello, John! My name is Chris and I work for ABC Company."

Always end letters, emails, and other communications with a comma. This shows that you have finished writing and allows the reader time to finish reading your message.

When do you put a comma after a colon in an email?

In more formal situations, you might use a colon after your salutation. For example, if your email salutation begins with "Hello" or "Hi," place a comma before the name of the person you're addressing. For example, if you were writing to several people, your letter would look like this: "Hello, Mary and John! Thank you for getting back to me so quickly."

In most cases, a comma is needed after a colon because it acts as a division marker. When writing emails, it is important to keep in mind that readers will be able to see only the first line of your email. Therefore, any information contained in subsequent lines of text must provide additional context for what is going on in the original message.

An example of a correct way to write a colon-separated list is provided below. Note that even though these items are listed in alphabetical order, they have been separated by colons rather than commas because they represent separate ideas. A comma would have joined each item together instead:

Colon Separated List

Toothbrush, toothpaste, razor, etc.

As you can see, there are many ways to write sentences with commas and colons.

Do you put a comma after the salutation in an email?

A colon is the most professional way to conclude a salutation in business communications. The greeting in the preceding example is made up of an adjective and a name, with no comma between the two. A comma, however, should be used to separate a straight greeting from a person's name. So, for example, if you were to write, "Good morning, Mrs. Smith," there would be a comma after "Mrs.".

If you're writing to more than one person, use multiple commas. For example, if you were to write, "Eve, Steve, and Linda,:" there would be three commas used because each person received a separate letter. Commas are also used when writing formal letters or emails where each recipient is given their own line of text.

In informal letters or emails (where no names are used), only one comma is needed after the straight-forward greeting. For example, if you were to write, "Good morning!" there would be no comma after "morning".

When sending emails with questions attached, it is appropriate to start the sentence with a question mark. For example, if you were to write, "Do I put a comma after the salutation?" you would get an answer yes, you do. This tells you that you should include a comma after the salutation in your email.

About Article Author

Bradley Smith

Bradley Smith has been writing and publishing for over 15 years. He is an expert on all things writing-related, from grammar and style guide development to the publishing industry. He loves teaching people how to write, and he especially enjoys helping others improve their prose when they don't feel like they're skilled enough to do it themselves.

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