When should you not use bullet points?

When should you not use bullet points?

Use no end punctuation if all of the bullets are sentences or fragments. Make sure your bullet points aren't so long that they seem like paragraphs. A maximum of three lines is a fair length. When you have more than five bullet points, number them. That way it's easy to see which ones are most important and what has been left out.

End notes use punctuation even though they're not parts of sentences. This is because they can be added at the end of a document or email message, so they need a closing mark to show this. Punctuation is as vital for end notes as it is for main body text; without it readers can't tell where one note ends and another begins.

Here are some examples of appropriate uses of punctuation in bullet points:

No end punctuation is used when all the bullets are sentence fragments or complete sentences.

A full stop (period) is used before the first bullet point, then followed by a comma before each subsequent bullet point.

A question mark is used instead of a full stop before the first bullet point, but a full stop is still needed after that point too.

An exclamation mark is used instead of a full stop before the first bullet point, but a full stop is still needed after that point too.

Should bullet points have periods in PowerPoint?

Here's what we think: After each bullet point that is a sentence, use a period. After bullets that aren't sentences, don't use any punctuation. This includes bullet points, such as the one seen above, in which only single words are printed on each line.

Do you put periods after bullet points in PowerPoint?

This entails putting a full stop after each bullet point.

Should resume bullets be one line?

All of your bullet points should ideally fit on one line. If you have a very long sentence, attempt to relocate it to the end of the bullets so that another bullet point does not mix with the conclusion of the phrase. This will help your reader understand the point you are making and give them time to process what they have read.

Do PowerPoint bullets need periods?

Here's what I suggest: After each bullet point that constitutes a sentence, use a period (full stop). After bullets that are not sentences, do not use punctuation and do not finish the stem. Use either all sentences or all fragments, not a combination.

Can you have two sentences in a bullet point?

Make all of them phrases, fragments, or queries, for example. If you have two sets of bullet points in a document, you don't have to make them consistent with each other—just with themselves. Bullets should be punctuated regularly. If all of the bullets are sentences, make sure you conclude each one with a period (full stop). Otherwise, they're just fragments - nothing else.

Do bullet points need punctuation?

Bullet points are used as punctuation. Use capital letters and punctuation if the content of your bullet point is a complete sentence (or many phrases). You do not need to conclude with punctuation if your points are not formed as proper sentences. For example, "We encourage you to visit our website" is more effective when written as a bulleted list than as a full-sentence paragraph.

Can you have more than one sentence in a bullet point?

For example, "We encourage users to review our privacy policy," is better written as simply "Review our privacy policy."

Multiple short bullet points can be difficult to read. Break up longer bullet points into multiple smaller ones to improve readability.

About Article Author

Jennifer Green

Jennifer Green is a professional writer and editor. She has been published in the The New York Times, The Huffington Post and many other top publications. She has won awards for her editorials from the Association of Women Editors and the Society of Professional Journalists.

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