Who is the speaker at the mid-term break?

Who is the speaker at the mid-term break?

The speaker of "Mid-Term Break" is a high school student whose brother was murdered by an automobile. The poem is autobiographical, based on a true event in Seamus Heaney's life.

Heaney wrote this poem while working as an assistant in a hospital library. He used his knowledge of medicine to help make the poem more realistic. Mid-Term Break has been called a "quiet masterpiece".

Here is the opening paragraph of the poem:

"At the mid-term break, when the students are free/To wander back to their homes for the summer,/The teacher asks her class about themselves/And uses what they say to write a poem."

These are the most common questions that the speaker of the poem asks her classmates and uses their answers to create a poem.

What is so great about this poem?

This poem is great because it is written by someone who is not only a teacher but also a librarian. Seamus Heaney wanted to share his feelings about mortality after his brother died in a car accident. But instead of writing a traditional poem, he wrote a short story about it first. Then he converted this story into a poem later. This shows that this poem is not only meaningful but also creative too!

What is the mood of the poem "Break Break Break"?

"Break, break, break" is a little poem with a sorrowful and nostalgic tone. Tennyson manipulates these components to disclose a poem about death and loss. The poem provides a seaside scene, replete with a wild sea, playing children, fisherman, and sailing boats, but Tennyson manipulates these aspects to reveal a poetry about death and loss.

In this poem, Tennyson uses irony to disclose a piece of information that might not be apparent from just reading the poem. For example, although the poem begins with the phrase "Oh! what joy to be young," it does not take long for the speaker to realize that life without love is meaningless. In addition, there are several allusions in this poem to other poems by Tennyson. One example is the reference to "Ulysses" which appears in line 4. Ulysses was one of Tennyson's favorite poets and he often used characters and scenes from their works in his own.

Another example is the reference to "Mariana" which appears in line 12. This is another one of Tennyson's poems about lost love. It was originally written for Marianne Taylor but she rejected it. Instead, he wrote her a different poem called "Locksley Hall".

At the end of the poem, the speaker realizes that life must go on even though someone has died. However, he or she also understands that love is important because it can make life worth living even when you are alone.

What is the speaker in the poem "Break Break Break" asking the sea to do?

In Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem "Break, Break, Break," the speaker laments that he is unable to shout out his inner feelings as he addresses the sea in an apostrophe. He asks the sea to break his heart into a thousand pieces so that it can never be put back together again.

The speaker in this poem is a man who has been deeply affected by tragedy. His two brothers have died during their youth, and now he feels like he is about to die too because they are going to break up his heart (which is what the sea means when it says it will break him). So the speaker begs the sea to give him pain so that he will not have to feel happiness again.

This poem was written in 1827 when Tennyson was only twenty-one years old. He had just lost his father and his brother who were both very close to him. With no one else to take care of him, he went to live with his older brother who was married with children of his own. This left Tennyson without any protection or support except from his angry mother who hated both her sons.

So it is easy to understand why he felt like breaking down and crying.

About Article Author

David Suniga

David Suniga is a writer. His favorite things to write about are people, places and things. He loves to explore new topics and find inspiration from all over the world. David has been published in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, The Guardian and many other prestigious publications.

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