Who wrote "Daddy fell into the pond?"?

Who wrote "Daddy fell into the pond?"?

Alfred Noyes, Daddy, tripped and fell into the pond! The Society of Authors, as Literary Representative of Alfred Noyes' Estate, has granted permission for this use. Alfred Noyes (1880–1958) was an English poet, novelist, short story writer, children's book author, and playwright. He is best known for his poem "The Song of Hiawatha," which has been adopted as the official song of Michigan.

Noyes was born in London but grew up in Detroit, where his father, a lawyer, had been appointed by the government to oversee the construction of a new court house. When Alfred was eight years old, his father won the lottery and moved the family back to London, where he became involved in theatrical productions. At age 20, Noyes published his first collection of poems, Signs of Spring, which was followed by three more volumes over the next five years. In 1903, he married Florence Robinson; they had one son together before divorcing in 1919. That same year, he married his second wife, Helen Gray Noyes; they had two daughters together before divorcing in 1935. From 1936 until his death in 1958, he was married to his third wife, musician Evelyn Greenlee.

In addition to writing poetry, novels, short stories, plays, and children's books, Noyes also created several comic strips, including Buster Brown from 1905 to 1910 and Jimmy Swann from 1910 to 1913.

When did Charles Kingsley write the Water Babies?

1863 The Water-Babies: A Fairy Tale for a Land-Baby, written by Cambridge history professor Rev. Charles Kingsley (1819–1875), was published as a book in 1863, but initially appeared in serial installments in Macmillan's Magazine between 1862 and 1863. It is based on stories told to Kingsley by his friends about "the wild water babies who lived in the lakes and rivers of England." He decided to write a story about them after reading Edward Lear's Book of Nonsense.

Charles Kingsley was born on April 23rd, 1819 in Alton, Hampshire, the only child of William Kingsley, an Anglican clergyman, and his wife Hannah (née Garnett). He had two older sisters and three younger brothers. His father died when he was eight years old and his mother moved with her children to live near her parents in Cambridge. There she married again, this time to John Charles Friswell Kingsley, a wealthy curate. She died four years later, when Charles was twenty-two years old.

He went to Cambridge University where he developed an interest in theology and in 1842 was ordained into the Church of England. In the same year he traveled to West Africa as a missionary priest with the London Missionary Society. While there, he learned several languages including Hausa, Kanuri, and Yoruba.

Who wrote "water babies"?

Kingsley, Charles Authors of The Water-Babies Illustrated The Water-Babies: A Fairy Tale for a Land-Baby, written by Cambridge history professor Rev. Charles Kingsley (1819–1875), was published as a book in 1863, but initially appeared in serial installments in Macmillan's Magazine between 1862 and 1863. It is based on stories told to Kingsley by his friend and fellow writer HRH the Prince of Wales.

Charles Kingsley wrote several other books including two more fairy tales for children, The Hermite's Heart and The Two Princesses of Whiteland.

He was also known for his work in theology and academia. He was the first Professor of Church History at Cambridge University when the post was created in 1847. He died in London at age 55 after falling from his horse while riding home from an academic meeting where he had just presented a paper.

Charles Kingsley's wife was named Frances Elizabeth Elgee. They had three children together before she died in 1871.

He then married another woman named Hannah More who was a famous author herself. She is best known for her works Compassionate Friendships: How Life Writes Fiction But Fiction Doesn't Write Life Kingsley wrote the introduction for one of Hannah More's books called Home Education: Its Principles and Practice. Hannah More lived until 1895 when she was 90 years old. She is buried with Charles Kingsley in St. Mary's Cemetery in Cambridge.

Where did Thomas Hardy live as a child?

Thomas Hardy (1840–1928), the famous English novelist and poet, was born in Stinsford, Dorset, England, where his father, Thomas Hardy (1811–1892), worked as a stonemason and local builder. This website contains only a portion of our Hardy research. For more information about Hardy's life, read some of our other articles or view our bio page.

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