Why did Francis Scott Key write the Star Spangled Banner?

Why did Francis Scott Key write the Star Spangled Banner?

Francis Scott Key writes a poem on September 14, 1814 that is eventually adapted to music and becomes America's national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner," in 1931. The poem, originally titled "The Defense of Fort M'Henry," was written after Key watched the British bombardment of the Maryland fort during the War of 1812. In his poem, he describes the scene before him and gives voice to his anger at seeing his country's flag being shot by the British.

Key had been invited to attend the siege as a civilian observer. But when news of the attack on the fort reached him, he hurried to join the fighting with other American soldiers. He was wounded during the battle and left for dead, but survived. After the war, he wrote about his experiences in a series of letters to his sister-in-law that were later published as a book called "Letters from the Alamo."

In addition to writing "The Star-Spangled Banner," Key also wrote another famous poem called "O! Say Can You See" which is sometimes used as an introduction to "The Star-Spangled Banner."

He died in 1843 at the young age of 46.

Number 10 on our list of the 10 most popular national anthems doesn't really have a clear reason behind it being written.

What did Francis Scott Key do in the War of 1812?

Francis Scott Key (August 1, 1779–January 11, 1843) was an American lawyer, novelist, and amateur poet from Frederick, Maryland, best remembered for composing the lyrics to "The Star-Spangled Banner." During the War of 1812, Key saw the British bombardment of Fort McHenry. The memory of this event inspired him to write a poem that would become our national anthem.

Key joined the United States Army at the age of 37 as a second lieutenant in the Baltimore Light Infantry. He was given a commission as a first lieutenant in the United States Navy but never served due to poor health. After the war, he returned to Frederick where he practiced law and wrote poems. In 1820, he published The Declaration of Independence, an epic poem that drew on his experiences during the war. This poem is often considered the first true American epic.

Key is also known for writing the novel Israel Potter (1833), which is considered a founding work of American literature. His other works include collections of poetry, including The Voyage of the Beagle (1839) and The Gift of Blackness: A Poem (1842). He died in Baltimore at the age of 63.

After graduating from the University of Maryland School of Law, Francis Scott Key began practicing law in Baltimore in 1805. He became interested in politics and was elected as a delegate to the Continental Congress in December 1814.

Which is the second verse of the Star Spangled Banner?

Based on its use before sporting events, an old joke goes that the second stanza of the "Star Spangled Banner" is the chief umpire's call: "Play Ball!" The real flag depicted in the poem has survived, and it is rather huge even now.

Francis Scott Key writes a poem that is eventually put to music and becomes America's national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner," on this day in 1814. After witnessing the British attack of the Maryland fort during the War of 1812, Key wrote "The Defence of Fort McHenry."

What was Francis Scott Key’s occupation?

Francis Scott Key/Professions is an author, lawyer, poet, and lyricist.

Francis Scott Key (August 1, 1779–January 11, 1843) was an American lawyer, novelist, and amateur poet from Frederick, Maryland, best remembered for composing the lyrics to "The Star-Spangled Banner." During the War of 1812, Key saw the British bombardment of Fort McHenry.

Why is the Star Spangled Banner the national anthem?

After being delighted that the United States had escaped British assault, Francis Scott Key penned the "Star-Spangled Banner" as a joyful poem. Since then, it has grown into the United States' national anthem, and it is played at official ceremonies, schools, and athletic events. The song is based on a British drinking song called "To Anacreon in Heaven," and its lyrics were set to the music of a popular Baltimore folk song called "Mary's Boy."

Key was a slave owner who lived in Maryland. In 1814, he wrote the poem after the war ended. It was first sung at a celebration held by Washington before an audience including President James Madison. The president was so pleased that he ordered that the song be taught to children in schools across the country.

Key didn't want anyone to think he was criticizing America by writing about a beautiful woman who would someday become his wife. So he used words like "brightest" and "glorious" when describing her eyes and hair. But he also wanted people to know that she was human too - so he included references to burning villages and crying babies among other things.

The poem is now considered one of the most important American patriotic songs.

Key died in 1843, more than twenty years after writing the song.

What was written by Francis Scott Key as an eyewitness to the battle of Fort McHenry?

The Battle of Fort McHenry inspired Francis Scott Key to create "The Star-Spangled Banner" on September 14, 1814. Mark Clague of the University of Michigan debunks some widespread fallacies concerning our national anthem. He writes that it's not true that "The Star-Spangled Banner" is only about war or that it's inappropriate for today's society.

Key was a 25-year-old attorney and diplomat who was stationed in Baltimore during the battle. He watched from across the Patuxent River as the British bombarded the fort and captured it after only nine hours. The attack left only one brick wall standing among the trees. With no roof to protect them from the rain, many of the soldiers inside were killed. Inspired by what he saw, Key later wrote a poem that would become America's national anthem.

About Article Author

Jennifer Green

Jennifer Green is a professional writer and editor. She has been published in the The New York Times, The Huffington Post and many other top publications. She has won awards for her editorials from the Association of Women Editors and the Society of Professional Journalists.

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